Spinning Your Way to Prosperity

It’s gardening time in North America.

 

Spring trees and flowers are blooming and even in the coldest areas, perennials are popping up out of the ground.  Have you ever thought about planting a soap garden?

 

Read, How Does Your Garden Grow?  A Soapmaker’s Garden, by Beth Byrne, and then tell us what you’re growing or planning to grow in your soap garden.

 

In a completely unrelated topic, what do wars have to do with soap and candlemakers?  Quite a bit, actually, if you sell them.  Tamara Dourney explains in, Remembering the Post-War Era why and how the various war efforts affected the economy in the past, and speculates on the possibilities that may take place once the current war that the US is involved in is over.  Prosperity or doom?  While the outcome is yet to be determined, you can prepare and position yourself for either scenario.

 

On the formulator’s front. . . a natural preservative, how many of us wouldn’t want something all natural for our lotions and creams?  Does one exist?  Erica Pence gives us the low-down in her article, The Great Debate:  Is There a Natural Preservative?  Not surprisingly, the jury is largely still out regarding the new, natural preservatives, but we do get to read about some of them.

 

Denise Marks gets our wheels turning in, Spin for Success.  In an entertaining way, she teaches us about business and life, helping us to overcome failures and obstacles while taking advantage of our good ideas.  Be sure to read this one if you haven’t already.

 

Until next time, happy bubbles and wax as you spin your way through life!

 

Beth Byrne


 

 

It Takes all Kinds!

I was thinking recently about all the types of soapmakers and candlemakers out there.

 

Some like to keep things as basic and natural as possible.  In fact, if it were possible to make soap without lye, these individuals would do it.  These candlemakers use natural waxes as opposed to using paraffin wax.

 

At the opposite end of the spectrum, we know soapmakers who are concerned only with the process or the art of soapmaking and are willing to use whatever resources are at their disposal to make the soap they love.  The same is true for some chandlers whose main goal is either production or beauty.  It’s not that this group of crafters don’t care if their products are safe, they just believe that the legal ingredients they use are safe for their customers so they are free to use them as they desire.

 

Most of us, however, fall somewhere between the two extremes.  Some of us insist on organic carrier oils, but scent with fragrance oils. Others use only essential oils, but use synthetic or nature identical colorants.   Still others use no soy or no animal products or no palm oil.  Moreover, good share of cosmetic makers are searching for effective natural preservatives.

 

The choices are nearly limitless and may cause confusion for both newbies and the experienced alike.  What’s really natural or acceptable?  How much not-so-natural is acceptable?  If I make products without regard to their naturalness or acceptability to various groups, are my products inferior?  Add to that other concerns such as moral ones or sustainabililty and you have an entirely new set of questions.

 

With this vast array, we might believe that life would be much easier if we weren’t offered so many possibilities.  What does it gain us?  Quite a bit, actually.  First of all, it causes us to do research, the result being more knowledgeable artisans.  Secondly, it provides us with niche markets.  We can sell to vegans or vegetarians, to those looking for a more natural way of life, customers who avoid certain groups of ingredients or those who are seeking products they like the looks, scent, and performance of.  It really does take all kinds!

 

Where in this wide spectrum do you find yourself?

 

Until next time, may you happily wade in bubbles & wax.

 

Beth Byrne