Dealing with the Public: How do You do it?

Dealing with the public, any of us selling soap, body products, or candles do it.

 

We all get comments about our products that are inaccurate or even rude.

 

 “That lye soap will take your hide off!”

 

 “I’m not going to pay for that when I can get the same thing at the store for a dollar.”

 

“That (insert ingredient) is junk/disgusting/unhealthy.”

 

“I can make that for half the price.”

 

Other times, you may be asked, “How do you make that?  Where do you get your supplies?”

 

I can see you shaking your heads now.  You’ve heard it all.

 

On a more positive note, you may be asked, “What makes your product better than what I can buy at the store?

 

Admittedly, it can be a challenge.  Situations arise that we are unprepared for, leaving us groping for replies.  If you’re like me, you don’t always feel that you’ve dealt with their comments or questions well.

 

 

What can we do?  Lashing out at the customer or running into a corner to cry is not a positive response, no matter how tempting.  However, thinking about the questions ahead of time and preparing yourself with answers is key to diffusing  tense situations as is adequately explaining your product so that your customer understands how special your goods are and how fortunate the public is to have access to them.

 

I welcome shoppers asking what makes my products worth the money I charge because it’s a perfect opportunity to explain the ingredients and the process I use, and also the care I take in creating my goods, often convincing a skeptic that she wants to purchase what I have to offer.

 

The rest is a little more difficult, but if we’re in the trenches with the public, we must learn how to deal with comments and questions with grace and tact, perhaps even a bit of humor.

 

What do you say to rude comments that degrade your product?  I’ll get us started.  To, those who claim “lye soap” is harsh, I counter that it often was true in the past, but today, you’ll find soap to be a very gentle cleaner in comparison.  I then hand them a sample to prove my point.  I haven’t actually found that to sell soap to this group, but if I can get a few people here and there to understand the difference between old-fashioned soap and modern soap, we’ve all gained.

 

Your turn.  Choose any of the above questions and comments and tell us how you reply.  Let’s help each other!