How do You Prefer Your Education?

Education.  Do you think of stuffy classrooms where you struggled to stay awake, or was your experience a positive one of engaging discussion and good test results?  Do you prefer a formal or an informal mode of education?  And why am I talking about education at all on the Saponifier blog?

 

If you hadn’t noticed, the new issue is all about education, in particular, educating ourselves about soapmaking, candlemaking, and related topics–herbs, chemistry, art and design, and so on.  If we sell product, we can throw in accounting and marketing.  Fortunately, we can continue educating ourselves, whether we physically go back to school, we learn online, or we learn  informally through books and other research.

 

Tamara Dourney filled us in on some exciting methods of formal education, by way of online learning in her article, Open Source Scientist.  If your opinion of this modern way of being educated is negative, think again.  Many opportunities for study at recognized institutions are available, and they continue to evolve and develop, making it easier for artisans to increase their knowledge of subjects important to their crafts.  Tamara also wrote about various potential career paths that are related to our crafts in,  Career Day:  Five Options for Continuing Education.

 

If you prefer doing your own research on a specific topic, Erica Pence’s, Natural Resources and her second article, Candle Resources, both filled with good books for learning soap and candle making, essential oils, herbs, botanicals and other body care products.  Your knowledge base is sure to greatly increase by studying them.

 

If you find yourself wishing to take a class, be sure to read Marla Bosworth’s, 10 Tips for Selecting the Right Soap and Skincare Classes to Match Your Needs.  Heeding her comments may mean the difference between a wonderful class you’ll think was worth every penny and one that was a waste of time and money.

 

In this issue, you’ll even find an educational herb monograph on the lovely Glacier Lily, more commonly called, Dog-Toothed Violet or Trout Lily in my neck of the woods.  I had no idea of the food and medicinal uses for this early spring treasure!

 

Whether you are a staunch believer in conventional education and desire to pursue a degree or you are looking for something less formal, but no less educational, you’ll find ideas in the above articles.  Tell us how YOU like to learn.

 

Until next time,

Happy bubbles & wax adventures.

Beth Byrne

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